About

One Dharma Forum

IPPOAN (一法庵 / One Dharma Forum) is a temple in Kamakura, Japan, and also a community of practice where you can learn and practice the Dharma under the guidance of the head priest Ven. Ryodo Yamashita, Sudhammacara Bhikku. Meditation taught at the One Dharma Forum is a unique method called the One Dharma Method, developed by Ven.  Yamashita based on his extensive study and practice in both Zen and Theravada traditions. With its doors open for any seekers who pursue the Way, IPPOAN has been a one of a kind space where you can learn and practice the Dharma in an exciting way in which mindfulness meditation is redefined in the context of Zen.

As a Community of Practice

One Dharma Forum as a community of practice centers around Ven. Yamashita’s meditation retreats. One day retreats are offered on Saturdays and Sundays, and 5-day retreats are offered every month. Since the teacher resides in Kamakura, meditation classes and retreats usually take place in the Greater Tokyo area, although one-day retreats are occasionally offered in other parts of Japan.

Meditation classes and Dharma talks delivered in Japan are taught in Japanese. Currently, English-taught international retreats are offered solely outside of Japan. Recordings of Dharma talks and guided meditation instruction are available via Podcast. International retreats have been held in Korea, Taiwan, and selected parts of India. Details of the past international retreats and plans for the future can be found here.

Non-Japanese are welcome to attend meditation classes and retreats in Japan; however, participants are expected to be proficient in the Japanese language to understand the Dharma talks, follow meditation instructions, and join the Dharma discussions.

As a Temple

IPPOAN as a temple was founded by Mr. Yoshiaki Yamashita, the late father of Ven. Yamashita in 1985. It is located in the scenic and history-rich town of Kamakura, which is known for the Five Great Zen Temples, and was also the birthplace of the Kamakura Buddhism that sparked reformist movements of Japanese Buddhism in the 12th to 13th centuries.

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